What Does it Mean When a Website is Not Secure? What To Do About It?

Chances are you have heard about the dangers of an insecure website. You could also be asking yourself, why does my website say not secure, or wondering what it means when a website is not secure. Read on to find out what cybersecurity experts really mean when they say a site is not secure, and how to improve your site’s overall security.

What Does It Mean When a Website Is Not Secure?

So, what does it mean when a website is not secure in today’s world? Most web browsers alert users if they view insecure web pages by displaying a “Not Secure” warning. This indicates the web page is not providing a secure connection to visitors. When your browser connects to a website, it can either use the secure HTTPS or the insecure HTTP protocol. If a site’s URL begins with HTTP, it means the connection is insecure, which triggers the “Not Secure” warning.

What Happens If a Site Isn’t Secure?

When a website says not secure it can have serious consequences, especially if it is an eCommerce site. Insecure websites are vulnerable to cyberthreats, including malware and cyberattacks. If your site falls victim to a cyberattack, it can impact the site’s functioning, prevent visitors from accessing it, or compromise your customers’ personal information. In addition, a cyberattack can damage your company’s reputation and cost you customers. Research shows if your customers’ confidential information gets compromised, 65% of them won’t return to your site. Along with the loss of customers comes a loss of revenue, which can be especially devastating to small businesses.

How to Secure Your Site

There are a few ways to secure a site when a website says not secure. One important way to secure your website is by installing an SSL certificate. This establishes a secure connection for visitors and changes your URL to begin with HTTPS, indicating your site is trustworthy.

In addition, it’s crucial to partner with a reputable cybersecurity provider offering website security solutions. These include automated malware scanning and removal, vulnerability patching to address weaknesses in your site, and a web application firewall (WAF) to block malicious traffic. – Read more

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How to Make A Website Secure: A Guide for Business Owners

Given the ever-present threat of cyberattacks, it is crucial for business owners to make website security a top priority. Although the question of how to make a website secure might sound complex, it’s not as hard as it seems. In fact, just taking a few simple steps can greatly improve your website security. If you’re a business owner, read on to learn about how you can secure your company website.

How to Make a Website Secure in 6 Steps

When it comes to web security for business owners, here are six simple steps how to make a website secure.

1.    Install an SSL certificate

These days, installing an SSL certificate on your site is a must. An SSL certificate protects your data as it travels between your site and the server. This makes it more difficult for cybercriminals to intercept sensitive information such as credit card numbers. Many hosting providers offer a free SSL certificate, but if you handle credit card information, it is recommended that you purchase one as it has more security benefits (i.e. longer certificate lifespan – Extended Lifespan (LV), tech support and a warranty).  

2.    Sanitize input fields

Cybercriminals often access a website’s database through its contact forms. To prevent this, ensure form data is formatted properly within each input field before it’s submitted. You can accomplish this by predefining what a visitor can type in each field. For example, you might only allow letters and hyphens in the name field. Regularly sanitizing the input fields on your website is important for securing your database.

3.    Use client- and server-side form validation

It’s also crucial to check the data in each form field before it’s submitted to prevent malicious data from entering your system. You can implement client-side validation using JavaScript to review form data and ensure it’s acceptable before submitting it to your web server. As an added precaution, use server-side validation so your server can also review the data before accepting it.

4.    Scan for malware

Another important step for how to make a website secure is regularly scanning for malware. You can simplify this process by investing in an automated website malware scanner that monitors your site for threats 24/7. For added security, opt for a solution that automatically removes any malware immediately upon detection.

5.    Implement vulnerability patching

Website vulnerabilities are weak points in your website’s code that cybercriminals can exploit to gain control of your site. These vulnerabilities are often caused by outdated plugins or CMS (content management system) software. To safeguard your site, you can invest in a vulnerability scanner to find and patch site vulnerabilities.

6.    Use a web application firewall

Finally, business owners can implement a web application firewall (WAF) to provide an additional layer of protection for their websites. A WAF monitors all incoming and outgoing traffic to your website and blocks unwanted traffic, malicious bots, and cyberthreats from reaching your site.

Keep Website Security Top of Mind 

It’s also important for businesses to make cybersecurity a company-wide priority. Here are a couple of ways to help ensure security remains a priority within your organization: – Read more

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The 5 Most Commonly Asked Questions About Cloud Solutions

We believe there are many reasons to migrate your organisation’s applications to the cloud, not least of which are cost savings, streamlined operations, redeployment of resources, reskilling of your internal teams and talent retention.  

In this blog, I answer the five most common questions I get asked about moving applications to the cloud, so you can make an informed decision about whether it’s the right thing for your organisation.  

1. Is it secure and where is my data? 

“Is it secure?”  is one of the most commonly asked questions about the cloud. But as the cloud has become universal in organisations, the nature of the question has changed. 

Every year, major cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft spend billions to make their cloud services stable, robust and secure. Security measures and compliance certifications are available for all to see, and Microsoft’s cloud offering is as secure as it gets in terms of compliance, governance and physical security.  

The result? Today, almost everyone accepts that the cloud is secure. The conversation now is less around how secure it is and more around data control. It’s essential that organisations understand where their data lives, where it may go and who can access it in order to feel comfortable with moving to the cloud. 

A lack of understanding around how the cloud works is a barrier to adoption for many organisations. In the UK, law firms are amongst some of the most cautious adopters of cloud solutions, largely because of questions about where confidential client data will reside and who can access it.  

There needs to be an understanding that, by its very nature, the cloud exists in multiple locations – and your data can too. Azure, for example, for resilience can have multiple copies of data in multiple locations. And this conversation isn’t always an IT-led discussion; it needs the business to decide in which country their data should be reside, and whether they are comfortable with it potentially leaving UK soil. The cloud gives customers choice here, different services having different options about where data is stored, but it’s important that well informed decisions are made in this regard. 

Organisations need to know what they are letting themselves in for and understand how data will be stored and accessed which needs a complex, but not impossible, discussion about trust and understanding. In our experience, anyone who truly understands the options and how the cloud works has been confident in making an informed decision based on facts not fear.  

2.  Will all my IT staff be out of work/redundant? 

Generally, there isn’t a direct correlation between adopting cloud services and IT staff being let go.  We prefer to see this as freeing up IT staff to focus on more strategic tasks. 

Whether they’re in retail, manufacturing, healthcare or any other sector, businesses are trying to be ‘the best’ and provide the best service to their customers. IT should enable them to do that. It should be a supporter and enabler for a business to do its job and operate at its highest level. And for organisations that are held back by inefficient, outdated IT systems, embracing the cloud is one way to make improvements. 

Few organisations today choose to use physical servers; they are costly, require office space and need people to maintain and manage them. Solutions like O365 and Exchange Online are making delivery of common IT services easier, better and lower cost, and like it or not, the requirement for on-premise skills will reduce as cloud adoption becomes the new norm. As IT evolves, the skillset of IT teams needs to evolve with it, or face being left behind.  – Read more